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Indomitable Spirit: Book review

by

Dr.A.P.J Abdul Kalam

Avul Pakir Jainulabdeen Abdul kalam was born on October 15,1931and has the unique honour of being the recipient of the country’s top civilian awards : the Padma Bhushan in 1981, Padma Vibhushan in 1991 and the Bharat Ratna in 1997. Dr.A.P.J Abdul Kalam became he eleventh president of India in July 2002.

The book Indomitable Spirit is an awesome book written by Dr.A.P.J Abdul Kalam.It is the experience from his own life’s journey from the shores of Rameswaram to the hallowed portals of  Rashtrapati Bhawan. In this book Dr.Kalam has showed great respect towards women and says that "womanhood is a beautiful creation of God" and this is explained in chapter-9 (Empowered women) which particularly depicts examples of women who have defied society norms and have done well to rise beyond their expectations. According to him, "there is no other profession in the world that is more important to society than that of a teacher" which is explained in chapter-2 (My Teachers).  And this is what is liked the most as I aim to become a teacher. It gave me more interest towards that profession. He has great hopes towards the youth of the nation.  Indomitable spirit has two components. The first component is that there must  be a vision leading to higher goals of achievement.The second component is the ability to overcome all hurdles coming in the way of mission accomplishment.

In this book he tells the young men and women, "success can only come to you by courageous devotion to the task in front of you". Since I conclude that the youngsters should read this book as it is very inspiring, and by reading this book one becomes self – confident courageous and determined.

Reviwed by

Anuja S.S. (XI A)

 
4 Comments

Posted by on November 10, 2010 in My Dear Book

 

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Raj of the Rani

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By

Tapti Roy

This book of Tapti Roy deals with the life of a warrior queen from history – Rani Lakshmibai , who was a figure in the gallery of heroes of the ‘First war of Independence’. Apart from the descriptive events of the freedom struggle,the book also presents the life of common man during the time of British rule in India.It is more than a fiction,realistic more than being dramatic in language.This book deals with the different phases of Rani Lakshmibai’s life – transition from Manikarnika (daughter of Moropant Tambe) to Rani Lakshmibai,queen of Lhansi is depicted very clearly.The life of energetic,vivacious and brave child, brilliant and expert queen is being presented with different versions of same story. As the information is collected from reliable sources, it is a good source of reference too.It salutes the valour of the nation’s heroes who sacrificed their lives to provide the freedom we enjoy today.It presents the chain of historic events which ultimately led to the freedom.We feel the patriotism while reading each and every line of this book and it honours this brave woman who found out her place in history.

Reviewed by

Arya S

XI A

 
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Posted by on September 15, 2010 in My Dear Book

 

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The Family Tree

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By

Barbara Delinsky

A white couple just bears a baby akin to an African American in appearance! This undoubtedly raises many eyebrows and some awkward questions too. Yes, this is how the novel The Family Tree authored by Barbara Delinsky starts, throwing in a piece of news for the reader to chew on. As the name suggests, this novel is predominantly about a quest for the roots of a family, following a peculiar development in the lives of the key characters.

This intriguing story reveals a world of blue-blooded, refined class of people placed in distinguishable positions, where the main character Hugh Clarke belongs. But on the other hand, his wife Dana had lost her mother at a very young age and found her peace of mind at The Stitchery owned by her grandmother. As soon as her African-American-resembling girl child is born, her world turns upside down with a variety of responses coming from her acquaintances, some comforting yet some too bitter. And there starts a tale of pursuit to dig up the details of her ancestors who might have been African-Americans or in other words, to bring out her family tree which was way too obscure to get hold of.

Barbara Delinsky has done a good job in weaving a tale of suspense with an incredible climax. She has tried to convey her thoughts on the racial prejudice existing even today in America. Some of the whites who feign to cling on to ideals against racism have been vehemently ridiculed by the author. Be sure to check out The Family Tree to get to know more about people who clasp faith even in the hardest of testing times.

Reviewed by

Salini Johnson, XI A

 
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Posted by on February 8, 2010 in My Dear Book

 

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The World of Malgudi

 

by

R. K .Narayan

It is rated as one of R.K Naryan’s best works. Starting with Mr Sampath, we are told of collaborative efforts of Srinivas,the editor, and Mr Sampath,the printer,who work together on a local weekly. We next meet Margayya,in"The financial expert",who sits under a banyan tree and gives advice on methods of extracting loans from the local cooperative bank.In "Painter of Signs" ,we encounter the unlikely love story of Raman,the local signboard painter,and daisy,a bith control propagandist who is on a visit to Malgudi.Finally, in a "A Tiger For Malgudi",a venerable tiger looks back over his life,from his early days roaming around in the wild in the jungle to his unhappy years in captivity.

Reviwed by

Mathew Abraham, VI A

 
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Posted by on January 29, 2010 in My Dear Book

 

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A Fine Balance

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by

Rohinton Mistry

Perhaps the first thing that catches your eye about A Fine Balance penned by the veteran author Rohinton Mistry, recipient of many accolades and whose books have been shortlisted for the Booker Prize many a time, would be the chunkiness of the book, what with the story spreading out to more than six hundred pages. A Fine Balance is undoubtedly a meticulously written novel, rich in superfluous detail, which is set mainly in the 1975 India. It has a certain charm and rawness entwined to it that would make sure that the reader sticks on to its pages which are overflowing with the naiveté of the proletariat.

The novel literally maintains a fine balance between the stories of the four protagonists who meet at one point of the book, during and after which their lives are altered beyond imaginable ways but mostly ending up at heartbreaking crossroads. At first comes Dina Shroff, a girl based in the then Bombay in a well-to-do Parsi family. Her narrative revolves mainly around her family who was shattered by the passing away of her father which culminates in her mean brother, with his hypocritical ideals, taking the control of the house. This finally leads to an abrupt end to Dina’s education. Later, she meets Rustom Dalal and turns into Mrs. Dina Dalal as she is known throughout the rest of the story. Her husband, who is too good to be real, dies in a freak hit-and-run accident at the night of their third wedding anniversary, which leaves a traumatized Dina behind. She was determined enough for a young widow to say an outright no to a second marriage and to refuse a place under her brother’s roof, probably ending up as an unpaid servant for life! But instead she strived to fend for herself with help from one of her childhood friends.

Parting with Dina’s narrative for now, the pages take us to “In a village by a river” where we are introduced to Ishvar, Narayan, later Om and the story of their ancestors. This area of the book is ostensibly nothing but a tale of woe sometimes taking on a harsher version reducing us to tears. It deals with the caste system and the outrageous brutality of the loathsome landlords who deserve to be ripped apart. The effectual and overpowering account rendered by Rohinton Mistry in his fluid flow of language enrages the reader to act against the despicable acts of the so-called upper caste men upon the destitute.

Then again as life moves on, we move on to Maneck Kohlah, a boy leading quite a carefree life up in the mountains inhaling lungful of fresh, pure air each morning, absolutely oblivious to the lives down in the cities. In this part of the novel, we are treated to the frivolities of the families in the mountains, co-existing in complete harmony and wrapped up in their personal worlds of blithe. Ishvar and Om as tailors and Maneck as a paying guest find themselves at Dina’s house. Gradually they steer clear of their prejudices and make quite a company! But nothing too good stays for long. And so the merciless hands of fate unclenched apart their bonds of intimacy and friendship and strewed them across for their own destinies to devour them.

A Fine Balance does a lot of talk on the Internal Emergency declared in India during the setting of the novel. It does compel the reader to put your thinking cap on and frown. The author is visibly taking a harsh and cut-and –dried stand against the then Prime Minister, even making a complete mockery of her at one instance of the plot. But, all the same, the opinion whether biased or not all depends on the mindset of the reader. But one thing we can never deny is the fact that Rohinton Mistry has once again proved his sinuous style of unfolding the chronicles of the hoi polloi with such passion, rawness, simplicity and candor that it is next to impossible not to keep the pages turning and finally reach 614th page!

Reviwed by

Salini Johnson

Class: XI-A (Shift-I)

 
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Posted by on November 17, 2009 in My Dear Book

 

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The diary of a young girl

 

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by

Anne Frank

This diary written by Anne Frank helps us to understand the views and thoughts of the teenager. Anne Frank opens her heart in this diary and writes down her emotions . In this she writes about the political situation and sufferings that the Jews had to undertake during Hitler’s regime. Anne Frank first wrote  the diary on a Sunday, 14th June, 1942. Then she and her family went hiding on Thursday, 9th of July 1942. In hiding also she continued to write about their hiding place, Van Daan family with whom they were sharing the hiding place, little quarrels between her and her mother etc. She also wrote about her longings for the outside world. She faced her problems with a smile and humour. Anne Frank last wrote the diary on Tuesday, 1 august, 1944. And then she was captured by the Gestopos on 3rdAugest . This diary was her best and loyal friend.

I like this book very much. This is very interesting to read as this is written by a teenager in simple language. This reveals us the situation of Jews under Hitler’s rule.

Reviewed by

Rubsana N Beegum

11-A

 
2 Comments

Posted by on October 16, 2009 in My Dear Book

 

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The Two Towers

 

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By

J. R. R. Tolkien

The Two Towers is the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkien’s high fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. It is preceded by The Fellowship of the Ring and followed by The Return of the King.

In a desperate attempt to save the middle earth, To form a fellowship of nine walkers to accompany Frodo on his hopeless mission to destroy the ring of power.

As you all must have known by now, the fellowship was broken at the end of the first part with the book one describing the events of the three companions, Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli, who represent the three great races of Middle Earth,who set out on a relentless chase in a bid to rescue the two hobbits from their merciless captors.This part of the book is a bit slow, though it has its moments like the hobbits escaping from the orcs, ents wars,etc.

But it seems that Tolkien had saved the best for the second part.So, what has become of Frodo and Sam?They have chosen a separate dangerous path to destroy the ring.And the ever elusive Gollum is still behind them.Now i won’t spoil the fun by giving a detailed a synopsis.If you want to know what happens next, you will have to read the book for yourself. It is a grievous story of treachery illumined only by the love of Sam wise for his master.

Another nerve-shredding episode of The Lord of the Rings Ends.

Reveiwed

By

Varun.H.S

X-B (Shift_I)

 
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Posted by on August 17, 2009 in My Dear Book

 

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